Secure your PC for free!


BufferZone Security SoftwareSecurity, when it comes to computers, is as important as it is with most things. Trouble with computers though is that its difficult to keep ahead of the hackers and other scoundrels who are out to get you.

Well, help is at hand from Trustware, with their free software, BufferZone. According to their site:

“BufferZone creates an isolated environment called the Virtual Zone. The Virtual Zone “buffers” your PC from all forms of known or unknown attacks that originate from the Internet and external devices. All of your private information is secured in a trusted and separated environment.”

It does this by creating a virtual environment, within which your PC is isolated from any threats. By creating a special directory – C:\Virtual in your computer’s registry, it keeps external programs and files in an isolated environment, separated from your trusted personal files and your PC’s operating system.

According to Trustware, even your online banking is safe, as are your documents. It promises to prevent spyware, keyloggers, botnets or any other Internet born malware from stealing your personal data and documents, even if anti-virus and anti-malware hasn’t yet identified the threats. If it truly lives up to the claims then this is one piece of software you should seriously consider installing.

You can read more about BufferZone on the company’s website. If you are wondering just how safe your PC is they also have a free security test you can download from their site.

You can rest assured that the software is trustworthy as CNET gives it 5 stars!

Adobe products still full of security holes


Adobe Shockwave Player Logo
Image via Wikipedia

Adobe security holes are just like No. 73 buses, you don’t have to wait long before another one comes along. Now it seems that Adobe Shockwave Player has a zero-day vulnerability which could potentially allow an attacker control of your computer.

This is unwelcome news to say the least, with millions of computer users having installed Shockwave Player. Of these, the majority will either be totally unaware of the issue and have poor security, or not sure about what to do. It doesn’t help that Adobe is notoriously slow in patching its products.

Adobe has acknowledged the hole affects Shockwave Player 11.5.8.612 and earlier versions on the Windows and Mac operating systems. This is after a researcher made the exploit code public. The security flaw means a hacker could theoretically take control of your computer, with all the implications that has for loss of personal data and your computer becoming a ‘zombie’ computer, spreading trojans and spam across the net to other computers.

So, if you have Adobe Shockwave Player installed on your computer you need to follow these steps:

1. Make sure you are using the very latest version as out of date versions are even more insecure, remaining unpatched for earlier vulnerabilities.

2. Make sure you are fully protected with anti-virus and anti-spyware software. Make sure too that it is fully up to date and that you regularly scan your computer for problems.

Of course, if you are a Mac user then you are less vulnerable but its best to be vigilant and never give permission for any process that you are not sure is genuine.

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Java vulnerability in Mac OS X finally patched



It was a long time coming but we finally have a patch for the Java vulnerability in OS X. Apple has made the ptch available vi Software Update. Java for Mac OS X 10.4, Release 9 delivers improved reliability, security and compatibility for J2SE 5.0 and J2SE 1.4.2 on Mac OS X 10.4.11 and later. This release updates J2SE 5.0 to version 1.5.0_19 and J2SE 1.4.2 to version 1.4.2_21.

For more details on this update, please visit this website: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3593

For information on the security content of this update, please visit this website: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1222

Adobe finally patches security hole



Adobe has finally issued a patch for a security vulnerability that could have allowed a hacker to take control of your compromised system.

Adobe Reader and Acrobat version 7,8 and 9 were all affected by the scurity hole which could have caused the applications to crash before allowing unauthorised access. Adobe had previously recommended turning off Javascript support to prevent
attacks until it could issue the patch.

That can now be re-enabled with the updates available from adobe.com/support/downloads/new.jsp.

Earlier this week Adobe released an unrelated update for Fireworks CS4, providing bug fixes and greater stability.